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We’ve had many people in lately complaining about how their skin feels dryer than usual…and asking what the best moisturizer might be for them. So of course we talk to them about toners 😉
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Actually, we talk to them first about drinking enough water, exfoliating regularly and using gentle, hydrating cleansers, but enough of them were skipping the whole toning process, for it to warrant a post about the purpose, and importance of using a toner.
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Some people use a toner simply because they’re following the age-old process of Cleanse. Tone. Moisturize. without really understanding why. That was me...about 6 years old. I would cleanse and then spritz my toner on a cotton pad and get to work on removing all the goop that my cleanser was supposed to, and hadn’t. And I wasn’t gentle either - the more grime I could see on the cotton pad - the better and the more satisfying. .
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What I didn’t understand at the time was that I was stripping my skin of any natural oils still there after cleansing. The purpose of ‘toning’ was lost on me, and continues to be on many others. .
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The purpose of a toner is two-fold: to hydrate and to balance the skin’s pH. Hydrating our skin is key in any climate, but never more so than in a dry one. By gently exfoliating and cleansing we open our pores skin and prime them for receiving hydration. This is when you want to use a toner, preferably one that is water-based; does not have witch-hazel unless it’s been extracted with organic grape alcohol; and has lots of other nourishing ingredients that your skin will soak up. .
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Re. balancing your pH...pH is a scale that measures acidity and alkalinity, with zero being the most acidic, 14 the most alkaline, and 7 neutral (that’s where water falls). Our skin's optimal pH is around 5.5, which is slightly acidic and perfect for the growth of the skin's natural bacteria. It’s also ideal for our skin's enzymes, which seal in hydration and exfoliate dead skin cells.
.
.
Most cleansers, especially if they are soap-based will lean towards the alkaline side and can change our skin from acidic to alkaline—where our skin isn’t at its happiest - and which often leads to dryness. More.....
We’ve had many people in lately complaining about how their skin feels dryer than usual…and asking what the best moisturizer might be for them. So of course we talk to them about toners 😉 . . Actually, we talk to them first about drinking enough water, exfoliating regularly and using gentle, hydrating cleansers, but enough of them were skipping the whole toning process, for it to warrant a post about the purpose, and importance of using a toner. . . Some people use a toner simply because they’re following the age-old process of Cleanse. Tone. Moisturize. without really understanding why. That was me...about 6 years old. I would cleanse and then spritz my toner on a cotton pad and get to work on removing all the goop that my cleanser was supposed to, and hadn’t. And I wasn’t gentle either - the more grime I could see on the cotton pad - the better and the more satisfying. . . What I didn’t understand at the time was that I was stripping my skin of any natural oils still there after cleansing. The purpose of ‘toning’ was lost on me, and continues to be on many others. . . The purpose of a toner is two-fold: to hydrate and to balance the skin’s pH. Hydrating our skin is key in any climate, but never more so than in a dry one. By gently exfoliating and cleansing we open our pores skin and prime them for receiving hydration. This is when you want to use a toner, preferably one that is water-based; does not have witch-hazel unless it’s been extracted with organic grape alcohol; and has lots of other nourishing ingredients that your skin will soak up. . . Re. balancing your pH...pH is a scale that measures acidity and alkalinity, with zero being the most acidic, 14 the most alkaline, and 7 neutral (that’s where water falls). Our skin's optimal pH is around 5.5, which is slightly acidic and perfect for the growth of the skin's natural bacteria. It’s also ideal for our skin's enzymes, which seal in hydration and exfoliate dead skin cells. . . Most cleansers, especially if they are soap-based will lean towards the alkaline side and can change our skin from acidic to alkaline—where our skin isn’t at its happiest - and which often leads to dryness. More.....